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Taxpayers received about $659 million in refunds during fiscal year 2023, representing a 2.7 percent increase in the amount of refunded to taxpayers in the previous fiscal year.


The IRS announced that final regulations related to required minimum distributions (RMDs) under Code Sec. 401(a)(9) will apply no earlier than the 2025 distribution calendar year. In addition, the IRS has provided transition relief for 2024 for certain distributions made to designated beneficiaries under the 10-year rule. The transition relief extends similar relief granted in 2021, 2022, and 2023.


The IRS, in connection with other agencies, have issued final rules amending the definition of "short term, limited duration insurance" (STLDI), and adding a notice requirement to fixed indemnity excepted benefits coverage, in an effort to better distinguish the two from comprehensive coverage.


The Tax Court has ruled against the IRS's denial of a conservation easement deduction by declaring a Treasury regulation to be invalid under the enactment requirements of the Administrative Procedure Act (APA).


For purposes of the energy investment credit, the IRS released 2024 application and allocation procedures for the environmental justice solar and wind capacity limitation under the low-income communities bonus credit program. Many of the procedures reiterate the rules in Reg. §1.48(e)-1 and Rev. Proc. 2023-27, but some special rules are also provided.


The IRS has provided a limited waiver of the addition to tax under Code Sec. 6655 for underpayments of estimated income tax related to application of the corporate alternative minimum tax (CAMT), as amended by the Inflation Reduction Act (P.L. 117-169).


The IRS has issued proposed regulations that would provide guidance on the application of the new excise tax on repurchases of corporate stock made after December 31, 2022 (NPRM REG-115710-22). Another set of proposed rules would provide guidance on the procedure and administration for the excise tax (NPRM REG-118499-23).


The new year brings a new tax filing season. Mid-April may seem like a long time away in January but it is important to start preparing now for filing your 2011 federal income tax return.  The IRS expects to receive and process more than 140 million returns during the 2012 filing season.  Early planning can help avoid any delays in the filing and processing of your return.

As 2012 gets underway, Congress has extended the employee-side payroll tax cut but a laundry list of tax incentives have expired and their renewal is in doubt.  The fate of these incentives, along with the Bush-era tax cuts, will dominate debate in Washington D.C. in 2012.  At the same time, tax planning in a time of uncertainty appears to have become the new normal.

Looking back over 2011, the IRS, Congress and the courts made many tax decisions impacting taxpayers of all types. Some tax developments were taxpayer-friendly; others imposed new requirements on taxpayers.  Here is a brief rundown of the top 10 federal tax developments of 2011.

The Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act (FATCA), enacted in 2010, requires certain U.S. taxpayers to report their interests in specified foreign financial assets.  The reporting requirement may apply if the assets have an aggregate value exceeding certain thresholds. The IRS has released Form 8938, Statement of Specified Foreign Financial Assets, for this reporting requirement under FATCA.

Claiming a charitable deduction for a cash contribution is straightforward. The taxpayer claims the amount paid, whether by cash, check, credit card or some other method, if the proper records are maintained. For contributions of property, the rules can be more complex.

Congress’ Joint Select Committee on Deficit Reduction (the so-called “super committee”) failed to reach an agreement by its November 23 deadline after weeks of sparring over the Bush-era tax cuts.  The Budget Control Act of 2011 created the bipartisan super committee in August and instructed it to develop proposals to reduce the federal budget deficit by November 23.  The super committee held many meetings and reportedly debated several proposals, all behind closed doors, to reform the Tax Code and entitlement programs. In the end, however, Democrats and the GOP remained far apart on taxes and entitlement programs and announced they could not agree on a final proposal.

As 2011 winds down, investors should consider several last-minute strategies to improve their bottom line tax liability. Many of these strategies follow traditional advice applicable to any year-end. Others, however, are unique to 2011, not only because of the continuing impact of the economy but also because of major tax changes that are threatening for 2013, which is just a little more than a year away.

The term "sick pay" can refer to a variety of payments. Some of these payments are nontaxable, while others are treated as taxable income. Some of the taxable payments are treated as compensation, subject to income tax withholding and employment taxes; others are exempt from some employment taxes. 

Depreciation is a reasonable allowance for wear and tear on property used in a trade or business or for the production of income. Property is depreciable if it has a useful life greater than one year and depreciates in value. Property that appreciates in value may also  depreciate if subject to wear and tear. Depreciation ends in the tax year that the asset is retired from service (by sale, exchange, abandonment or destruction) or that the asset is fully depreciated.

In light of the IRS’s new Voluntary Worker Classification Settlement Program (VCSP), which it announced this fall, the distinction between independent contractors and employees has become a “hot issue” for many businesses. The IRS has devoted considerable effort to rectifying worker misclassification in the past, and continues the trend with this new program.  It is available to employers that have misclassified employees as independent contractors and wish to voluntarily rectify the situation before the IRS or Department of Labor initiates an examination.

Charitable contributions traditionally peak at the end of the year-end. While tax savings may not be your prime motivator for making a gift to charity, your donation could help your tax bottom-line for 2015. As with many tax incentives, the rules for tax-deductible charitable contributions are complex, especially the rules for substantiating your donation. Also important to keep in mind are some enhanced charitable giving incentives scheduled to expire at the end of 2015.


Job-hunting expenses are generally deductible as long as you are not searching for a job in a new field. This tax benefit can be particularly useful in a tough job market. It does not matter whether your job hunt is successful, or whether you are employed or unemployed when you are looking.

2011 year end tax planning for individuals lacks some of the drama of recent years but can be no less rewarding.  Last year, individual taxpayers were facing looming tax increases as the calendar changed from 2010 to 2011; particularly, increased tax rates on wages, interest and other ordinary income, and higher rates on long-term capital gains and qualified dividends.

Many tax benefits for business will either expire at the end of 2011 or become less valuable after 2011. Two of the most important benefits are bonus depreciation and Code Sec. 179 expensing. Both apply to investments in tangible property that can be depreciated. Other sunsetting opportunities might also be considered.